Fasoracetam - An Anxiety-Reducing Nootropic

Fasoracetam – An Anxiety-Reducing Nootropic

Most nootropic users are familiar several smart drugs in the racetam family. Piracetam, aniracetam, oxiracetam, and phenylpiracetam are all popular nootropics with a wide variety of benefits.

There’s a lesser-known racetam that has been getting a lot of attention in the nootropics community over the past year or two: fasoracetam. This interesting smart drug can have powerful anxiety-reducing and mood-boosting effects in addition to its ability to improve memory and focus.

We’re gonna take a detailed look at fasoracetam. We’ll explore its benefits, common dosages, the best places to buy, potential side effects, and look at the science behind fasoracetam’s safety. But first, let’s go over what fasoracetam is.

What is fasoracetam?

Fasoracetam (aka NS-105, 5-0x0-prolinepiperidinamide) is a nootropic drug and a member of the racetam family, sometimes classified as a research chemical.1 It’s become mildly popular in the nootropics community for its ability to improve mood and memory, decrease anxiety, and improve focus.

Fasoracetam is able to reduce anxiety while improving memory and focus.

Unfortunately, there hasn’t been a lot of research done on fasoracetam, especially compared to some of the other racetams. The research that has been done, however, is very promising.

Researchers are currently investigating fasoracetam as a potential treatment for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other cognitive disorders.2 This isn’t surprising since many fasoracetam users report increased focus and improved learning.

Although this hasn’t been studied in humans yet, fasoracetam has been shown in rat studies that it interacts with the neurotransmitters GABA and acetylcholine.3 This explains, at least in part, how fasoracetam is able to improve memory and decrease anxiety.

Other animal studies have also shed some light on fasoracetam’s anti-anxiety and anti-depressant effects. One study showed that fasoracetam, when taken daily, can up-regulate GABA receptors.4 This study found an increased concentration of GABA-B receptors in the cerebral cortex of rats given fasoracetam regularly.

GABA (short for gamma-aminobutyric acid) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in humans.5 It’s known to play a role in anxiety, mood, arousal, sleep, and a number of other things. If fasoracetam up-regulates GABA-B receptors in humans like it does in other animals, this helps to explain its mood-boosting and anxiety-reducing properties.6

Unfortunately, we couldn’t find any published human studies that tested fasoracetam’s safety or effectiveness. However, it’s reasonable to assume that fasoracetam is safe when taken at the recommended dosages for two reasons.

First, fasoracetam has made it to Phase III clinical trials.7 These trials only move on to Phase III after completing the first two, which are designed to test the safety of a drug. If the drug isn’t safe, the clinical trial ends. If it is safe, the trial moves into Phase III.

The second reason we can assume fasoracetam’s safety is that thousands of nootropic users have tried it and no serious side effects have been reported. There are hundreds of anecdotal reports around the internet of people using fasoracetam without any ill effects.

Fasoracetam benefits

As mentioned, fasoracetam’s benefits have not been extensively studied in humans yet. Animal experiments have shown a lot of promise, however. And hundreds of anecdotal reports from around the world seem to suggest that many of the benefits seen in animals also happen in humans.

Fasoracetam - Pure NootropicsHere are just some of the benefits of fasoracetam that its users have reported:

  • Reduced anxiety
  • Improved mood
  • Increased focus
  • Improved memory
  • Improved learning

Fasoracetam dosage

There’s no consensus on what the best fasoracetam dosage is. Some users report a variety of benefits with only 10mg, while others need 100mg to notice fasoracetam’s effects.8

Like all other nootropics, it’s best to start with a low dosage and work your way up as needed. Around 10mg seems to be a good starting point for most people.

Fasoracetam side effects

Fasoracetam seems to be very safe when taken at reasonable dosages for short periods of time. It’s unknown if fasoracetam is safe to take long term (more than a few months). While it probably is, more studies will need to be done to confirm this.

Like the other racetams, fasoracetam may cause minor side effects in some people. These side effects may include upset stomach, nausea, headache, and insomnia. If you experience any of these side effects when taking fasoracetam, they should go away shortly after you stop taking it.

Where to buy fasoracetam

Currently, there aren’t a lot of places where you can buy fasoracetam. The only reputable fasoracetam vendor right now is Pure Nootropics. They have 20 mg fasoracetam capsules.

Conclusion

Fasoracetam - Pure NootropicsFasoracetam is a fascinating nootropic with a novel mechanism of action (relative to the other racetams). It has powerful anti-anxiety and anti-depressant effects, in addition to its ability to improve memory and focus.

As more and more research is done on fasoracetam, the more likely it will continue to grow in popularity. Right now, it’s hard to find and a little more expensive than most of the other racetams. To see how it compares to the others, check out this post: The Best Racetams: A Comparison.

References

1Shorvon, S. (2001). Pyrrolidone derivatives. Lancet, 358(9296):1885-92.

2Drug profile: fasoracetam. (2017). Retrieved on June 10, 2017 from http://adisinsight.springer.com/drugs/800003134

3Ogasawara, T., Itoh, Y., Tamura, M., Mushiroi, T., Ukai, Y., Kise, M., & Kimura, K. (1999). Involvement of cholinergic and GABAergic systems in the reversal of memory disruption by NS-105, a cognition enhancer. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 61(1):41-52.

4Shimidzu, T., Itoh, Y., Oka, M., Ishima, T., Ukai, Y., Yoshikuni, Y., & Kimura, K. (1997). Effect of a novel cognition enhancer NS-105 on learned helplessness in rats: possible involvement of GABA(B) receptor up-regulation after repeated treatment. European Journal of Pharmacology, 338(3):225-32.

5Gamma-aminobutyric acid. (n.d.). Wikipedia. Retrieved June 10, 2017 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma-Aminobutyric_acid

6Ulrich, D. & Bettler, B. (2007). GABAB receptors: synaptic function and mechanisms of diversity. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 17:298-303.

7ClinicalTrials.gov. (2017). Efficacy and safety of NFC-1 in adolescents with genetic disorders impacting mGluR and ADHD. Retrieved June 10, 2017 from https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT02777931

8Fasoracetam dose? (2016). Retrieved on June 13, 2017 from https://www.reddit.com/r/Nootropics/comments/44ijip/fasoracetam_dose/

Fasoracetam – An Anxiety-Reducing Nootropic
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